The Cressy Courier November 19 - New term of City Council, statement on Ontario Place, and more

Dear Friends,

Over the last 4 years it has been a privilege and an honour to serve as the City Councillor for Ward 20. Our downtown communities are among the most diverse and dynamic in the City, if not the country, and I couldn't be prouder to have represented you over the last 4 years.

As you may know, the new term of City Council will bring significant changes to representation in our city. This past summer, Doug Ford’s conservative government slashed the size of City Council from 47 to 25 Wards, without consultation. This presents a significant challenge to ensuring that we can continue to work together to build our neighbourhoods, and to provide the representation that our communities deserve.

However, I am committed to working together to ensure that, as we consider what changes are required to our municipal governance process, that local democracy and representation are at the heart of our decision-making.

Now more than ever, we need to ensure we are equipped with the tools we need to build our city, and to best respond to local needs and priorities, in wards now twice the size. In early December, Council will meet to consider how to restructure our municipal decision-making given the new 25-ward system. Once these decisions are made, I will be sure to provide an update.

For the new term of City Council - beginning on December 1 - communities in Ward 20 will become part of 2 new wards. I am privileged to have been elected to represent the new Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York, which mirrors the boundaries of the Federal and Provincial Riding. Neighbourhoods in the former Ward 20 that are south of Dundas are now part Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York, as well as many neighbourhoods from the former Wards 19, 27 and 28. As the City Councillor for Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York, I am excited to work together with all our diverse neighbourhoods - from Liberty Village to the Distillery District, the Grange to our Toronto Islands - to continue to build liveable and equitable downtown communities.

Beginning on December 1, neighbourhoods in the former Ward 20 that are north of Dundas will now be represented by the incredible Councillor Mike Layton. Over the past four years, it has been a privilege to work together with so many of you on critical projects in the North of Ward 20. From the revitalization at 250 Davenport, to protecting Kensington Market, to ensuring that we are proactively managing change, protecting heritage, and building new green spaces in the Annex, the Grange, Harbord Village and Huron-Sussex requires all hands on deck.

Until December 1, the old ward boundaries remain in effect, and I remain the City Councillor for Ward 20, Trinity-Spadina. Please don’t hesitate to contact me at any time.

It has been an honour to work with so many of you to build neighbourhoods that are liveable and equitable, and I look forward to continuing that work over the next four years.  

Sincerely,

Joe


Statement from Councillors Joe Cressy and Mike Layton on Ontario Place

On Friday afternoon, I released a statement with Councillor Mike Layton on the recent decisions and statements from the Provincial Government on Ontario Place:

"Ontario Place is a critical part of our City and Province. These treasured lands represent a crucial public asset that must be respected.

The Provincial Government's decision to eliminate the governing body of Ontario Place, and comments from Ministers regarding potential future redevelopment, raises many concerns regarding the liveability of our city and the use of valued public lands.

Any potential changes to Ontario Place must be made in the public interest, and must include a rigorous public consultation process. Ontario Place is for all Ontarians. Its future therefore must be discussed and decided in public, not in backrooms. We demand that the City of Toronto and local communities be involved in any discussion related to the future of Ontario Place.

And, let us be clear – a Casino at Ontario Place does not represent the responsible use of valued public lands. No good can come from it."


New Term of City Council begins December 1, 2018

As you may know, the new term of City Council will bring significant changes to representation in our city. This past summer, Doug Ford’s conservative government slashed the size of City Council from 47 to 25 Wards, without consultation. The election held on October 22 was to elect a new City Council under the new 25-ward boundary system, which will come into effect on December 1.

For the new term of City Council - beginning on December 1 - communities in Ward 20 will become part of 2 new wards:

It is my privilege to have been elected to represent the new Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York, which mirrors the boundaries of the Federal and Provincial Riding. Neighbourhoods in the former Ward 20 that are south of Dundas are now part Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York, as well as many neighbourhoods from the former Wards 19, 27 and 28.

Beginning on December 1, neighbourhoods in the former Ward 20 that are north of Dundas will now be represented by the incredible Councillor Mike Layton.

Until December 1, the old ward boundaries remain in effect, and I remain the City Councillor for Ward 20, Trinity-Spadina. Please don’t hesitate to contact me at any time.


Changes to School Board Ward Boundaries

In addition to changes to ward boundaries at the City Council level, the Provincial government also mandated changes to the ward boundaries of our local School Boards, including the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) and the Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB). These changes also come into effect on December 1.

New TDSB Ward Boundaries:

  • Municipal Ward 10 (Spadina-Fort York) is now part of TDSB Ward 9, Davenport and Spadina-Fort York. The incoming School Board Trustee for TDSB Ward 9 is Stephanie Donaldson.
  • Municipal Ward 11 (University-Rosedale) is now part of TDSB Ward 10, Toronto Centre and University-Rosedale. The incoming School Board Trustee for TDSB Ward 10 is Chris Moise.

New TCDSB Ward Boundaries:

  • Municipal Wards 10 and 11 are now part of TCDSB Ward 9. The incoming School Board Trustee for TCDSB Ward 9 is Norm DiPasquale.

TDSB Ward Council meeting - Final meeting with Trustee Ausma Malik, and meet your new TDSB Trustee

Join the final TDSB Ward 10 Council meeting with Trustee Ausma Malik.

Thursday November 29, 2018
Heydon Park Secondary School, 70 D'Arcy St.
6:00PM - Meet & Greet + learn about the school
6:30PM - Meeting begins

***MEET THE NEW TRUSTEES FOR OUR CURRENT TDSB WARD 10 SCHOOLS***

Stephanie Donaldson - Trustee-Elect for new TDSB Ward 9 (Spadina-Fort York & Davenport)
Chris Moise - Trustee-Elect for new TDSB Ward 10 (University-Rosedale & Toronto Centre)

CHILDCARE PROVIDED. REFRESHMENTS SERVED. ALL WELCOME!

Find important school council & TDSB information. Get to know your superintendents.
Share you ideas in our discussion on:
- What's working and what could be better to support your school councils?
- How can we be the best champions for our schools, communities and student success?


Coronation Park Heritage Restoration and Re-dedication

This past Saturday, November 10, the City re-dedicated Coronation Park following completion of the first phase of heritage restoration work.


Coronation Park was originally designed to commemorate the 1936 Coronation of King George VI and veterans of the First World War. A single Royal Oak stands at the centre of the park design, surrounded by groves of maples which each represent a military unit. Work is underway to restore the ceremonial arrangement of trees and associated pathways, as well as heritage markers and interpretive signage.

For more information on the City’s heritage restoration work, please see the project website.

If you would like to learn more about the history of Coronation Park, you can read about it in the October 2010 issue of Fife and Drum, the newsletter of the Friends of Fort York and Garrison Common.


TOcore needs your support!

After four years of hard work, for the first time since the 1970s we have a new master plan for downtown Toronto: TOcore. It's a plan to build a more liveable and sustainable downtown for the next 25 years. Each of the components of TOcore – the Downtown Plan and the five Infrastructure Strategies – will help manage and guide growth and development, while ensuring that growth is accompanied by investment in all the necessary community services and facilities that support healthy neighbourhoods, households, and individuals.

Under the Planning Act, new secondary plans such as the Downtown Plan must be submitted to the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing for review and final approval. This review process is underway and the province is currently accepting public comments until November 29, 2018.

It is very important that the Minister of Municipal Affairs receives supportive feedback about TOcore and the new Downtown Plan at this critical time. We can be sure that developers and other affected private interests are not passing up this one final opportunity to influence the outcome to their advantage. Please share your support through the Environmental Registry of Ontario under EBR Registry number 013-3485.

I also encourage you to email your comments directly to this Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing at minister.mah@ontario.ca.


Get the new TOwaste app

The TOwaste app is a new free tool from the City to help make your life easier and reduce the amount of waste that ends up in a landfill.

Key features include:

  • The Waste Wizard search tool with information on how to properly dispose of over 2,000 items.
  • Collection schedules for daytime curbside customers.
  • The ability to set reminders for your collection day and opt-in for alerts about service changes.
  • Information about where to find donation locations or City Drop-off Depots.

Visit www.toronto.ca/wasteapp to download the app for your iOS and Android devices.



Public Meetings

One Year In: The King Street Pilot
Monday, November 26 2018, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Metro Hall, Room 308 (55 John St)

Organized by TTCRiders, this meeting is an opportunity to share your experience of the King Street Pilot since its implementation in November 2017. There will be information on the pilot data and facilitated discussion about the pilot's impact on our public space and day-to-day lives. More information here:
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/one-year-in-the-king-street-pilot-tickets-51972104965


Public Consultation: Policies to Address the Loss of Dwelling Rooms
Tuesday, November 27 2018, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Metro Hall, Room 308 (55 John St)

The City of Toronto is holding public consultations to engage residents in the life of their city and they need your feedback on policies to address the loss of dwelling rooms in the city. Dwelling rooms in rooming houses are an important part of Toronto’s affordable housing landscape. As the city grows, development is placing pressure on the stock of existing dwelling rooms. The City of Toronto is proposing a draft Official Plan amendment with new policies to address the loss of dwelling rooms to development and the displacement of tenants who rent them. View the full meeting notice here.


King-Spadina Plan - Final Public Meeting
Tuesday, December 4 2018, 6:30 pm
Metro Hall, Room 308 (55 John St)

This is the final of a number of public meetings that have been held in recent years through the process of updating and modernizing the planning and development framework for the King-Spadina area, which will help to manage growth and ensure we are building complete, liveable, equitable communities. Now that the King-Spadina Heritage Conservation District and the TOcore Downtown Plan have recently been completed, City Planning staff will provide an update on how the King-Spadina Plan builds on that foundation.

David Crombie Park Revitalization - Public Meetings
The David Crombie Park Revitalization Design project will develop a comprehensive conceptual design and implementation plan for improvements to this treasured centrepiece of the St. Lawrence neighbourhood to meet the current and future needs of the community.

The project will be completed in four phases:

  • Fall 2018 Phase 1: Detailed investigation and assessment of park conditions. This includes public consultation.
  • Fall 2018 Phase 2: Preparation of a Communications and Consultation Plan.
  • Winter 2019 Phase 3: Revitalization Design Concept Options. This includes public consultation.
  • Spring 2019 Phase 4: Final Park Revitalization Design and Recommendations for Implementation. This includes public consultation.

November 20, 2018 – Public Kick-off Event
David Crombie Park: Reflecting Back, Looking Forward
7 to 8:30 p.m
North tent, Temporary Market, 125 The Esplanade

Come listen to a lively conversation on “Park + City Making”. Jane Farrow, author and former CBC broadcaster, will facilitate a conversation with three inspiring experts. David Crombie, the mayor at the time St. Lawrence Market neighbourhood was conceived in the late 70s,  will tell us about the inspiration, big ideas and challenges of creating the neighbourhood and its integrated “green spine” park. Renee Daoust, a Governor General award-winning Montreal architect and urban designer will share her insights into what makes fantastic parks and streets, showcasing projects from around the world. Janie Romoff, the City of Toronto’s General Manager of Parks, Recreation and Forestry will talk about exciting new directions for our City Parks and Public Realm. Together the panel will focus on David Crombie Park’s past and future–lessons learned and opportunities for the revitalization. The conversation will include questions and comments from the floor.

November 29, 2018 – Public Workshop
3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Adult Learning Room, St. Lawrence Community Recreation Centre, 230 The Esplanade

Both workshop sessions will begin with a presentation followed by table group discussions to provide input on what’s important, what you love about the park, what facilities or spaces are not working well, how you’d like to use the park, how you use the park now.